Pakistan issue is deep rooted in historical mishaps - Part 2

Sunday, February 22, 2009

Most of us in India and around the world are very critical of Pakistan for it's apathy towards fighting terrorism. The blame game is not going to work neither for India or Pakistan nor for the world at large. Pakistan is a victim of successive leaders/dictators, right from Mohammad Ali Jinha to Pervaz Musharaff, who have attempted to rewrite it's history for their own narrow motives. The present civilian government is under tremendous pressure to act against terrorism on it's soil. On one hand, it cannot blame it's past for the present problems, on the other hand it cannot ignore the international pressure. After decades of repeated mistakes, Pakistan is finally realizing the fact that it's problems are deep rooted in it's own mishaps. 

Read details of all misadventures of Pakistan and it's leaders in Part 1 of this article.

The roots of Pakistan's problems can be traced to undivided India's Freedom Movement. The "divide and rule" policy of British Raj, Mohammad Ali Jinha's differences with Congress and his own political ambitions, the infamous partition, Kashmir Conflict, Bangladesh liberation war (1971 Indo-Pak War), the cold war and subsequent balance of power in the world have all contributed to current mess in Pakistan.

Successive army dictators, from Ayub Khan to Pervaz Musharraf, "have attempted to rewrite this 'unfortunate country’s' history for their own narrow motives [Kamran Shafi]." Country's socio-economic development was given a backseat. Cultural developments were dominated/influenced by Shariat. Proxy wars fought by Pakistan resulted in widespread militancy and illicit drug trade. Prolonged political instabilities coupled with "military and ISI dominance" deprived the growth of democratic ideals. As a result, today, internal affairs of Pakistan are uncontrollable. The militants inside and around Pakistan have become exceptionally strong (blame it on US policies during cold war). Terrorists in Pakistan, once nurtured by United States and Pakistan, are becoming threat to the whole world. Pakistan's nuclear capabilities are adding to the fear and there is a clear apprehension of nuclear weapons falling in the hands of terrorists.

Today, the crisis in Pakistan is not because of the innocent civilians but because of it's rulers and their narrow motives. The problem in the region can never be solved by guns alone, India and rest of the world must understand that Pakistan's problem is deep rooted in cultural differences, socio-economic problems and political instability. What we need is not the prolonged postmortem of the past, but rigorous pursuit of new opportunities to bring the peace. Passing the blame on Pakistan is not going to do any good, the world must compassionately understand the situation and help Pakistan to realize it's political stability. Fortunately, civilian government is in power, they are facing problems because of misrule in the past. World need to understand that, Pakistan need some time to clean up the mess created by dictators. Terrorism can be fought with collective efforts and diplomatic paths should be continued with tenacity.

Peace does not come from the barrel of a gun but is achieved when cultural differences are respected and the fundamental rights of all are recognised and upheld [Desmond Tutu].

3 comments:

Pangala Nagendra Rao said...

I think you are right in saying "Today, the crisis in Pakistan is not because of the innocent civilians but because of it's rulers and their narrow motives." Today the civilian government is handicapped and is under tremendous pressure from both inside fundamental Terror groups, now Taliban, us and rest of the world. More pressure will weaken the moral strength of the government and this will lead once again for dictatorship. Rather military support and providing governing guidelines will change the life of "Aam Aadmi" in Pakistan.

स्वरूप जोशी said...

I couldn't ignore the paradox in your writeup(s).
You say "What we need is not the prolonged postmortem of the past", but yourself give the point-wise details of mistakes committed in in Pak's past. Your title suggests that we need to look into Pak history to understand today's situation, but you advocate "rigorous pursuit of new opportunities to bring the peace". You look a bit too confused in this couple of posts. What are you trying to suggest -
World should not pressurize Pak for action against terrorists ?

I disagree on some of your statements, too :
1. "The roots of Pakistan's problems can be traced to undivided India's Freedom Movement"
> actually it goes still deeper. it goes right into the concepts of dar-ul-harb and dar-ul-islam. rehmat ali (mentioned in part-1) had nothing else in his mind.

2. "the crisis in Pakistan is not because of the innocent civilians but because of its rulers"
> and whence cometh the ruler?
one can understand if a leader or two were abnormal. but the same policy for 6 decades !! aam-pakistani-aadami can't do away with that, just like we can't do away with our leaders - corrupt & all.
beyond a point, this argument makes no sense that people are good, leaders are bad. arre bhai, who is making them the leaders ? if 'yathaa raajaa tathaa prajaa' is true, so is 'people get the leaders they deserve'.

3. "Passing the blame on Pakistan is not going to do any good"
> you've used this 'passing the blame' phrase more than once. it has a connotation that we are a part of the crime as well, and now that the act is caught, are making pak a scapegoat. you obviously know that that's not the case. the blame is being squarely put on pak because they are harboring terrorists.

4. "World need to understand that, Pakistan need some time to clean up the mess created by dictators"
> and what good are they going to make of this time ?
swat, once called switzerland of pak, is already under sharia. are you expecting decline in the no. of terrorists being parceled to our country as more and more of the earth comes under sharia ?

5. "Peace does not come from the barrel of a gun but is achieved when cultural differences are respected and the fundamental rights of all are recognised and upheld"
> and pak under sharia is going to do that !!??

6. -last but not the least - "..mutineers considered him as a symbol of "united India""
> nothing's more painful and shameful when we ourselves call our first freedom struggle a mutiny !!
i hope this was just a slip-of-pen from you.

Manjunath Singe said...

@स्वरूप जोशी
Hey Joshi, Thanks for passing your thoughts, here is my response.

The paradox? I had to explain all the history in order to prove my point. I believe no one is so naive to believe what i say in my blog, things have to be proved with minute details :)

1. We had discussed about "dar-ul-harb and dar-ul-islam" before see here. What I all want to say is, religious fanatics's misinterpretation of the sacred texts and subsequent cruelty in the name of got has created a mess. Problem is bigger, solution must be extraordinary, the world has not yet arrived at the doors of solution for this issue and one can hope that the time will definitely come.

2. You should ask this question in indian context too. who is electing criminals in our parliament? who is electing people who doesn't desrve to make laws for us? Perhaps that would give you a compassionate answer.

3. I thought Part-1 would have given (in detail) the reasons for harboring the terrorists. What we and rest of the world need is the solution to the problem, not incinerating it over and over again.

4 and 5. well, thats bit exaggeration, wait and see, SWAT is the precusror to something unprecedented. I would say, time is the only answer.

6. I had picked that from a history text book. I thought i had put that in quotes but missed it. Sorry for that, it should have been, quote "mutineers considered him as a symbol of "united India" against the foreign (British) rule." unquote. :)

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